Move to Netherlands

Renting a house in the Netherlands

Renting is less risky and far more flexible than buying. You don’t have to worry about maintenance or insuring the property. The monthly rent is fixed and you have the freedom to end the contract within two months. On the other hand the rent paid is not a tax deductible item and you don’t benefit from a possible increase of the value of the house.

When renting, it is recommended to hire the expertise of a real estate agent who will make sure that everything thing is legally correct and that your best interest is protected. On the other hand if one feels confident enough to tackle this issue on his/her own perhaps due to previous renting experience elsewhere, or for the simple reason that you’d rather prefer avoid paying a one month’s rent commission to the real estate agent, then the following information will help you to stay on the right track for searching and subsequently renting a suitable accommodation.

First and foremost keep in mind that a verbal contract is binding under Dutch legislation, thus make sure to be absolutely certain about the property before making any written or verbal commitment. It is recommended to ask for an inventory list noting any pre-existing damages to the property, furniture or any other item if applicable. Make sure to check all the appliances including the heating system, the water heater and the radiator. Preferably an inspection should be made, after which an inspection report will be drawn up signed by both parties.

 

Generally lessor’s and lessee’s responsibilities are mentioned in the tenancy contract, mainly stating that minor repairs up to an agreed limit are to be borne by the lessee while major repairs shall be the responsibility of the landlord unless caused through fault or negligence of the lessee.

Normally for short lets (up to three months) utility bills including gas/water/electricity, telephone and internet are included in the rental. On the opposite, for longer rental terms, landlords prefer to keep utility bills separate and thus tenants need to apply for these services themselves. In this case, it is recommended to discuss this issue with the landlord on forehand, as it might get tricky when applying for these services due to language barriers.

Other issues such as decorating changes must be agreed upon and approved. Keep in mind that most of times, before moving out you are expected to return the property in the same original condition and state which means extra expenses and time resources

Generally lessor’s and lessee’s responsibilities are mentioned in the tenancy contract, mainly stating that minor repairs up to an agreed limit are to be borne by the lessee while major repairs shall be the responsibility of the landlord unless caused through fault or negligence of the lessee.

Normally for short lets (up to three months) utility bills including gas/water/electricity, telephone and internet are included in the rental. On the opposite, for longer rental terms, landlords prefer to keep utility bills separate and thus tenants need to apply for these services themselves. In this case, it is recommended to discuss this issue with the landlord on forehand, as it might get tricky when applying for these services due to language barriers.

Other issues such as decorating changes must be agreed upon and approved. Keep in mind that most of times, before moving out you are expected to return the property in the same original condition and state which means extra expenses and time resources.

Regarding the termination of the rental agreement, remember that you need to inform the landlord in advance, depending on the period of notice, and this is officially done by means of a registered letter. In case you do not give notice of termination, the contract will be automatically renewed for another year; silent renewal.

Apart from what is said above, there are other issues one must consider before accepting a rental agreement. We recommend you to take a look at our sample of tenancy contract which includes all the general rental terms, considering the best interests of both lessor and lessee. Further, whether you are a landlord or a lessee, you might want to compare it with your actual tenancy contract and thus making sure none of the principle aspects are left out.

(Visited 957 time, 1 visit today)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *